The truth about Samsung Knox for Android security

The truth about Samsung Knox for Android security

Credit: Alexander Shirokov

It was February 2013 when Samsung announced Knox, its containerization technology for higher-end Samsung Android devices. Knox is meant to create a virtual partition on Android devices that would insulate corporate-managed apps and data from attack, an approach pioneered by smaller companies such as Divide but not generally used in mainstream companies.

Knox is Samsung’s way to get past IT’s legitimate concerns over Android’s generally weak security and join Apple’s iOS and BlackBerry in the golden circle of trustworthy mobile devices. iOS is a sandboxed operating system, so it’s natively designed to prevent interapplication malware and data leaks; the BlackBerry 10 OS goes further, with an explicit containerization technology called Balance that the company’s proprietary management server can enable.

[ Mobile security: iOS vs. Android vs. Samsung SAFE vs. BlackBerry vs. Windows Phone. | Keep up on key mobile developments and insights via Twitter and with the Mobilize newsletter. ]

Fast-forward nine months. Though Samsung regularly touts Knox, the U.S. Defense Dept. certified it for government use, several vendors tout their support of it, and there’ve been many stories in the technology press describing it as a here-and-now option, the truth is it doesn’t fully exist. When it does finally become available later this fall, enterprises will discover an unpleasant fact: You have to pay to use it, on top of the subscription fees charged by your mobile device management vendor.

What you need to actually use Knox
To use Knox, your device must support its virtualization technology at the hardware level, which restricts Knox to these Samsung devices: the Galaxy Note 3 “phablet,” the Galaxy S III smartphone, the Galaxy S 4 smartphone, and the 2014 model of the Galaxy Note 10.1 tablet. Today, the Note 3 and S4 can run Knox, but only on some carriers’ models: Sprint and Verizon for the S 4; AT&T and Verizon for the Note 3, if you install their Premier Suite updates. The Wi-Fi-only Note 10.1 also runs Knox.

Samsung says it will deliver updates to make Knox work on the S III and on other carriers’ S 4 and Note 3 versions, but it also notes that each carrier decides when and if Knox compatibility is made available for the devices on its network. Not only do few devices support Knox, the carrier you use determines when or if those devices will actually be able to work with Knox. (Welcome to the fractured mess that is Android!)

You also need the Knox application and its included set of client apps, such as for email. That’s only recently been made available in the Google Play store for download.

You need a Knox-compatible mobile management server, for which you pay a monthly fee per user to manage Android and iOS devices; the fee depends on the management features you select. You cannot use Knox with Microsoft’s Exchange server, though it supports a base set of MDM protocols used by Apple and Google and is thus the “free” approach to MDM.

Source: http://podcasts.infoworld.com/d/mobile-technology/the-truth-about-samsung-knox-android-security-229994?source=rss_mobile_technology
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The truth about Samsung Knox for Android security

The truth about Samsung Knox for Android security

Credit: Alexander Shirokov

It was February 2013 when Samsung announced Knox, its containerization technology for higher-end Samsung Android devices. Knox is meant to create a virtual partition on Android devices that would insulate corporate-managed apps and data from attack, an approach pioneered by smaller companies such as Divide but not generally used in mainstream companies.

Knox is Samsung’s way to get past IT’s legitimate concerns over Android’s generally weak security and join Apple’s iOS and BlackBerry in the golden circle of trustworthy mobile devices. iOS is a sandboxed operating system, so it’s natively designed to prevent interapplication malware and data leaks; the BlackBerry 10 OS goes further, with an explicit containerization technology called Balance that the company’s proprietary management server can enable.

[ Mobile security: iOS vs. Android vs. Samsung SAFE vs. BlackBerry vs. Windows Phone. | Keep up on key mobile developments and insights via Twitter and with the Mobilize newsletter. ]

Fast-forward nine months. Though Samsung regularly touts Knox, the U.S. Defense Dept. certified it for government use, several vendors tout their support of it, and there’ve been many stories in the technology press describing it as a here-and-now option, the truth is it doesn’t fully exist. When it does finally become available later this fall, enterprises will discover an unpleasant fact: You have to pay to use it, on top of the subscription fees charged by your mobile device management vendor.

What you need to actually use Knox
To use Knox, your device must support its virtualization technology at the hardware level, which restricts Knox to these Samsung devices: the Galaxy Note 3 “phablet,” the Galaxy S III smartphone, the Galaxy S 4 smartphone, and the 2014 model of the Galaxy Note 10.1 tablet. Today, the Note 3 and S4 can run Knox, but only on some carriers’ models: Sprint and Verizon for the S 4; AT&T and Verizon for the Note 3, if you install their Premier Suite updates. The Wi-Fi-only Note 10.1 also runs Knox.

Samsung says it will deliver updates to make Knox work on the S III and on other carriers’ S 4 and Note 3 versions, but it also notes that each carrier decides when and if Knox compatibility is made available for the devices on its network. Not only do few devices support Knox, the carrier you use determines when or if those devices will actually be able to work with Knox. (Welcome to the fractured mess that is Android!)

You also need the Knox application and its included set of client apps, such as for email. That’s only recently been made available in the Google Play store for download.

You need a Knox-compatible mobile management server, for which you pay a monthly fee per user to manage Android and iOS devices; the fee depends on the management features you select. You cannot use Knox with Microsoft’s Exchange server, though it supports a base set of MDM protocols used by Apple and Google and is thus the “free” approach to MDM.

Source: http://images.infoworld.com/d/mobile-technology/the-truth-about-samsung-knox-android-security-229994?source=rss_infoworld_top_stories_
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Justice Dept. hopes to settle American, US Airways fight

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The Justice Department is pressing for divestitures at airports throughout the United States as a condition for dropping a lawsuit aimed at stopping a proposed merger of US Airways and American Airlines, U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder said on Monday.

Holder said that talks with the companies, whose merger would create the world’s largest airline, were ongoing and that he hoped for an agreement before a trial begins on November 25.

“What we have tried to focus on is to make sure that any resolution in this case necessarily includes divestitures of facilities at key constrained airports throughout the United States,” Holder said at a press conference.

“We hope that we will be able to resolve this short of trial but if we do not meet those demands that we have, we are fully prepared to take this case to trial,” said Holder. “We will not agree to something that does not fundamentally resolve the concerns that were expressed in the complaint.”

Shares of AMR Corp, parent of American Airlines rose 20 percent and shares of US Airways rose 4.5 percent after Holder’s remarks.

In a complaint filed in August aimed at stopping the proposed deal, Justice focused on Reagan National Airport outside Washington. The two carriers control a combined 69 percent of takeoff and landing slots at the airport.

In its complaint, the federal government also listed more than 1,000 city pairings where the two airlines dominate the market and where a merger could conceivably drive up prices or cut the number of flights.

US Airways declined comment on Holder’s remarks. American Airlines could not immediately be reached for comment.

(Reporting by Diane Bartz; Editing by Ros Krasny, Lisa Von Ahnn and Leslie Gevirtz)

Source: http://news.yahoo.com/u-justice-dept-hopes-settle-american-us-airways-170807587–finance.html
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UFC 167: Hendricks Plans to Showcase Power in Right Hand

There is no shortage of important fights set for the UFC’s schedule in November, but chances are you’d have a tough time finding someone arguing that Georges St. Pierre-Johny Hendricks isn’t the biggest. While GSP has his fair share of critics, he is the longest reigning champion in the UFC and is without question one of the planet’s best P4P fighters. In Hendricks you have a decorated wrestler with ridiculous KO power, who many believe could be the welterweight champ’s greatest challenge yet.

One of the big reasons many people feel this way is because of Hendricks’ left hand, which he’s used to end the nights of contenders like Jon Fitch and Martin Kampmann, and with just one shot. While speaking to FightHubTV.com recently, however, “Bigg Rigg” relayed that St. Pierre has to be concerned about another of his weapons at UFC 167 (comments transcribed via Bloody Elbow.com).

“I can lay you out with both hands. Everybody thinks that my left hand is the hand that’s going to do it, but my goal is to put him away and knock him out with my right. I am hurting people with my right hand in the gym, so that’s what it’s about, letting the world know I can do it with both (hands).”

“That’s what I want I want to do. I want to run into those takedowns. Just wait, I got stuff for that takedown. I’m a wrestler too, that’s what people forget. I know how to defeat a wrestler. I know how to stay away from takedowns.”

Considering Hendricks’ physical frame and the strength he’s showcased in the Octagon many times before, no one would be surprised to see him put someone away with a right hand. It’s going to be fascinating to see how aggressively Hendricks comes out, and how GSP reacts if he does. If you’re wondering, the betting lines have Hendricks as an underdog in the +175 to +185 range.

UFC 167 will go down at the MGM Grand Garden Arena in Las Vegas, Nevada, and will feature Chael Sonnen taking on Rashad Evans in the co-main-event.

Stay tuned to MMA Frenzy.com for all your UFC news and coverage.

Source: http://mmafrenzy.com/95515/ufc-167-hendricks-plans-to-showcase-power-in-right-hand/
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Kerry: US won’t allow attacks on Mideast partners

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry arrives in Cairo, Sunday, Nov. 3, 2013. Kerry is in Cairo pressing for reforms during the highest-level American visit to Egypt since the ouster of the country’s first democratically elected president. The Egyptian military’s removal of Mohammed Morsi in July led the U.S. to suspend hundreds of millions of dollars in aid. This is the first stop in an 11-day trip that will take Kerry to the Mideast and Europe. (AP Photo/Jason Reed, Pool)

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry arrives in Cairo, Sunday, Nov. 3, 2013. Kerry is in Cairo pressing for reforms during the highest-level American visit to Egypt since the ouster of the country’s first democratically elected president. The Egyptian military’s removal of Mohammed Morsi in July led the U.S. to suspend hundreds of millions of dollars in aid. This is the first stop in an 11-day trip that will take Kerry to the Mideast and Europe. (AP Photo/Jason Reed, Pool)

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, center, walks with Egypt’s Foreign Minister Nabil Fahmy, second left, to their joint press conference in Cairo, Sunday, Nov. 3, 2013. Kerry is in Cairo pressing for reforms during the highest-level American visit to Egypt since the ouster of the country’s first democratically elected president. The Egyptian military’s removal of Mohammed Morsi in July led the U.S. to suspend hundreds of millions of dollars in aid. This is the first stop in an 11-day trip that will take Kerry to the Mideast and Europe. (AP Photo/Jason Reed, Pool)

(AP) — U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry on Sunday tried to reassure America’s Arab friends that the United States will not allow them to be attacked “from outside,” in an apparent warning to Iran.

He specifically mentioned Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates, Qatar, Jordan and Egypt as nations, alongside unspecified “others,” that the U.S. will defend. Those others likely would include Israel, the strongest U.S. ally in the region.

“The United States will be there for the defense of our friends and our allies,” Kerry told reporters in Cairo. “We will not allow those countries to be attacked from outside. We will stand with them.”

Kerry spoke during the first stop on his trip to the Middle East, Europe and North Africa.

After Egypt, he headed later Sunday to Saudi Arabia, where the biggest rifts with the Obama administration have emerged.

Saudi officials have complained that the United States did not follow through on its threat to punish Syrian President Bashar Assad with military strikes for his government’s use of chemical weapons. The Saudis also have watched warily as President Barack Obama has opened a tentative rapprochement with Iran, Saudi Arabia’s archrival.

Kerry acknowledged U.S. divisions with Gulf nations over Syria and Iran, but he played down those differences. He said some countries do differ with U.S. “tactics” in Syria.

“There may some differences on a tactic here and there,” he said. But he said they all agree on the goal of ending the fighting and forming an interim government.

“We can have a difference on a policy, on the tactics of the policy,” he said. “For instance, there are some countries in the region that wanted the United States to do one thing with respect to Syria and we have done something else.”

He stressed, though, that “those differences on an individual tactic on a policy do not create a difference on the fundamental goal of the policy. We all share the same goal that we have discussed, that is the salvation of the state of Syria and a transition government put in place … that can give the people of Syria the opportunity to choose their future.”

Kerry added that that the United States would never allow Iran to obtain nuclear weapons. The administration is seeking a pause from the U.S. Congress in putting in place fresh penalties against Iran, in order to provide flexibility in negotiations.

A new round of nuclear talks between Iran and the five permanent members of the U.N. Security Council and Germany is set to begin Thursday in Geneva.

“Iran will not get a nuclear weapon,” he said. “That is a promise by the president of the United States.”

Associated PressSource: http://hosted2.ap.org/APDEFAULT/89ae8247abe8493fae24405546e9a1aa/Article_2013-11-03-ML-United-States-Mideast/id-12e4ee74e928447780ff1a5b0301d460
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Baseball 2013: Bosox win, Rivera exits, now replay

FILE – In this Oct. 1, 2013, file photo, New York Yankees’ Alex Rodriguez arrives at the offices of Major League Baseball in New York, for his grievance hearing. (AP Photo/David Karp, File)

FILE – In this Oct. 1, 2013, file photo, New York Yankees’ Alex Rodriguez arrives at the offices of Major League Baseball in New York, for his grievance hearing. (AP Photo/David Karp, File)

FILE – In this Oct. 30, 2013, file photo, Boston Red Sox relief pitcher Koji Uehara and catcher David Ross celebrate after getting St. Louis Cardinals’ Matt Carpenter to strike out and end Game 6 of baseball’s World Series in Boston. The Red Sox won 6-1 to win the series. (AP Photo/Matt Slocum, File)

FILE – In this Oct. 30, 2013, file photo, Boston Red Sox relief pitcher Koji Uehara and catcher David Ross celebrate after getting St. Louis Cardinals’ Matt Carpenter to strike out and end Game 6 of baseball’s World Series in Boston. The Red Sox won 6-1 to win the series. (AP Photo/Matt Slocum, File)

FILE – In this Aug. 15, 2013, file photo, Major League Baseball Commissioner Bud Selig grimaces during a news conference following baseball meetings at the Otesaga Hotel in Cooperstown, N.Y. (AP Photo/Mike Groll, File)

FILE – In this Oct. 26, 2013, file photo, Boston Red Sox catcher Jarrod Saltalamacchia, center, argues an obstruction call with home plate umpire Dana DeMuthm, right, in the ninth inning of Game 3 of baseball’s World Series in St. Louis. (AP Photo/Matt Slocum, File)

David Ortiz, Jonny Gomes and those bearded Boston Red Sox became the face of October, making for a most hairy joyride to the World Series championship.

The Red Sox reversed course and went from worst to first. Major League Baseball also saw big shifts this year — many bright, others more dark — at a time when the game could be transformed forever.

The Pittsburgh Pirates, at long last, found the winning touch. Mariano Rivera went out in style. But the sweeping Biogenesis suspensions showed the sport is far from drug-free. And the acrimony between Alex Rodriguez and MLB seems to get worse every day.

Plus, a whopping change coming up in what’s expected to be Bud Selig’s final season as commissioner: Instant replay will settle most disputes, rather than nose-to-nose rhubarbs between managers and umpires.

A look around the bases at 2013 and beyond:

___

I’LL TAKE ANOTHER: Ball. Foul. Ball. Foul. Mike Napoli, Daniel Nava and the Red Sox elevated the art of taking pitches and hitting foul balls to a new level, drawing cheers at Fenway from fans who appreciated their plate prowess. Boston wound up taking its third crown in a decade — fittingly, World Series MVP Big Papi drew four walks in the Game 6 clincher against St. Louis. Winning trends tend to be copied, so look for more patient teams to wait for their pitch next year.

___

AHOY!: The rise of the Pirates inspired just about everyone in the majors. After 20 straight losing years, Andrew McCutchen, Clint Hurdle and this band of Buccos reclaimed Pittsburgh as a baseball town. They came within a win of reaching the NLCS. Now they need to stay on top — not an easy trick, either. The Nats and O’s both fell off their playoff form. Cleveland and Kansas City are on their way, they hope.

___

THE GOODBYE GUYS: Mariano Rivera, Todd Helton and Andy Pettitte all played for the last time. Colorado gave Helton a retirement gift he could ride into the sunset — a champion horse. Pettitte came up with his own treat — in his final outing, he pitched his first complete game in seven years. Rivera made a touching farewell tour, and the Minnesota Twins found a perfect present — a rocking chair made of broken bats, a tribute to Mo’s devastating cutter. At 43, the all-time saves leader had tears in his eyes at Yankee Stadium when teammates Derek Jeter and Pettitte walked to the mound to pull him. “It’s time to go,” Jeter told his friend.

___

MATTINGLY’S HERE, FOR NOW: In June, it appeared Don Mattingly was on the verge of being fired as manager of the last-place Dodgers. Then, Yasiel Puig! The excitable Cuban rookie became the talk of baseball with his unbridled play, Los Angeles breezed to the playoffs and Donnie Baseball’s job was safe. But Puig fell flat in the NLCS finale loss at St. Louis, and Mattingly’s status is uncertain once again.

___

HOUSTON, WE HAVE PROBLEMS: The Astros won the MLB opener, prompting some to dismiss dire predictions for the AL rookies. Reality quickly set in — in their next game, Texas’ Yu Darvish came within one out of a perfect game. Overmatched nearly every day, low-budget Houston went 51-111, lost its final 15 games and set a big league record for strikeouts.

___

GEMS: Homer Bailey and Tim Lincecum pitched no-hitters in July. On the final day of the regular season, Henderson Alvarez celebrated his no-no in most unusual fashion. He was standing in the on-deck circle with two outs in the bottom of the ninth when a wild pitch by Detroit gave the Marlins a 1-0 win and put Alvarez in the record book.

___

MEN WILL BE BOYS: It was throw-down night at Dodger Stadium in June when a throwback brawl broke out between All-Stars from 1980s and ’90s. Managers Kirk Gibson and Don Mattingly, along with coaches Mark McGwire and Matt Williams got heated up after Arizona and Los Angeles threw at each other.

___

CLOSING TIME: Koji Uehara became a sure thing in Boston, only after closers Andrew Bailey and Joel Hanrahan got hurt. Uehara had been good in the past, but nothing like this. And a year before, the Rays’ Fernando Rodney suddenly became unhittable. Maybe a new pitch makes them all-World. Whatever, you can bet fantasy players are already scouring the stats for sleepers, trying to find the next guy who will blossom into a beastly closer.

___

HIRE AND HIGHER: Jim Leyland and Davey Johnson walked away and Dusty Baker was fired. The manager’s carousel is spinning, and there are jobs open with the Tigers, Cubs and Mariners. Will former skippers Manny Acta and Eric Wedge get a call, or will clubs look to promote newcomers Brad Ausmus and Tim Wallach?

___

TAKING ANOTHER LOOK: MLB intends to greatly expand instant replay next year, making most every call reviewable except balls-and-strikes. “It will be different,” World Series crew chief John Hirschbeck said before Game 1. A few hours later, umps huddled to correctly reverse a missed play on the bases. Next season, no arguments and no fuss. But no matter how many times they see it, Red Sox fans might not agree with Jim Joyce’s obstruction ruling.

___

HALL OF FAME … OR SHAME: Greg Maddux, Tom Glavine and Frank Thomas make their debuts on the Cooperstown ballot, with voting results coming in early January. Writers pitched a shutout last time, a loud statement against players who prospered in the Steroids Era. Will this election be different? The early consensus is Craig Biggio will get chosen on his second try, along with the new Big Three. Mike Piazza, Tim Raines and Jack Morris could make it sometime. But the taint of drugs is likely to keep out Barry Bonds, Roger Clemens, Rafael Palmeiro for a long, long time, if not forever.

___

THEY’RE IN PLAY: A day after his team won the World Series, Boston center fielder Jacoby Ellsbury became a free agent. So did outfielders Carlos Beltran, Shin-Soo Choo and Curtis Granderson, catcher Brian McCann and pitchers Roy Halladay, Matt Garza and Ervin Santana. Also, the Yankees need to figure out how much to pay star second baseman Robinson Cano. Some of that might be decided during the winter meetings in early December.

___

THE ANGST OF A-ROD: All-Stars Ryan Braun, Nelson Cruz, Jhonny Peralta and Everth Cabrera all accepted 50-64-game suspensions that stemmed from the Biogenesis drug investigation. Alex Rodriguez drew the most severe penalty at 211 games, appealed and didn’t miss a day pending the results of the union’s grievance. Rodriguez and legal team then filed suit Commissioner Bud Selig and MLB, accusing them of engaging in a “witch hunt.” No telling when this will be settled. Is there a chance A-Rod will play for the Yankees on opening day? Yes.

___

SELIG’S SWAN SONG: After a couple of balks, Commissioner Bud Selig insists next year really will be his final season and that he’ll retire at 80. He took over as acting commissioner in 1992 and MLB saw unprecedented growth during his tenure, along with several labor battles that led to peace with the players. He also was in charge when the 1994 World Series was canceled and during the days of heavy steroid use. At this point, no one is even close being a clear-cut favorite to succeed Selig.

___

PRIZE FIGHT: Who ya got for NL MVP — Andrew McCutchen, Yadier Molina or Paul Goldschmidt? Miguel Cabrera seems to be a lock on the AL side, with Clayton Kershaw and Max Scherzer lined up for Cy Youngs. Award season starts Nov. 11 with the AL Rookie of the Year.

___

ON DECK: Slightly over 100 days until teams break out the bats and balls for spring training in Florida and Arizona. Then MLB travels Down Under for the regular season opener — in Australia, it’ll be the Dodgers vs. Diamondbacks at the Sydney Cricket Ground on March 22.

Associated PressSource: http://hosted2.ap.org/APDEFAULT/347875155d53465d95cec892aeb06419/Article_2013-11-02-Baseball%202013/id-0e51f325fbf4488bad9561fa7d619c3a
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Street Talk

Inside the "on air" studio at Ghetto Radio in Nairobi, Kenya.
Inside the “on air” studio at Ghetto Radio in Nairobi, Kenya.

Courtesy Laura Dean

Each Friday, Roads & Kingdoms and Slate publish a new dispatch from around the globe. For more foreign correspondence mixed with food, war, travel, and photography, visit their online magazine or follow @roadskingdoms on Twitter.

NAIROBI, Kenya—Henry Ohanga Jr. sits down at the table in an upscale coffee shop in one of Nairobi’s malls. He wears a bright purple baseball cap cocked to one side, and a necklace with shiny black stones in the shape of a pharaonic head around his neck. Octopizzo—as he is known to his fans—is a rising hip-hop star from Kibera, a Nairobi neighborhood whose tagline is “the biggest slum in Africa.” He is one of the ones who found a way out, and he wants to help bridge the gap between places like Kibera and the so-called uptown—the wealthier stretches of Nairobi. Though Kenya is still shaken by last month’s horrific massacre at Westgate mall, it is also true that most of Nairobi couldn’t afford a cup of coffee in any of the uptown malls. “There are people [in Kibera] who’ve never been here,” he gestures to the mall-goers around us. And the people here, he says, have “never been to Kibera.”

Octopizzo is fluent in an unexpected medium for bridging that gap: Sheng, Nairobi’s urban language. There are 42 languages spoken in Kenya—Swahili and English are the two official languages—but Sheng is overtaking them all as the language of the big-city youth. It is a Swahili-based slang, with bits of English thrown in alongside other Kenyan and non-Kenyan languages. And, remarkably, it’s catching on across all parts of society.

Sheng began its life as a slang largely used by gangs in the poorest corners of Nairobi. The widely agreed upon origin story of Sheng is that in the 1980s and 1990s, a massive migration of people from the countryside to city resulted in large numbers of young people living in close quarters with their families in low-income neighborhoods in Nairobi. “When you had all these young people living together in these very crowded areas of Nairobi, [they needed] a language of secrecy,” says Professor Mungai Mutonya, senior lecturer in socio-linguistics at Washington University in St. Louis, “where they could be able to communicate without getting the information out to their parents.”

Today it isn’t uncommon to see Sheng pop up almost anywhere—on billboards, on the radio, in political campaign ads, and public service announcements.

Now the secret is out. Today it isn’t uncommon to see Sheng pop up almost anywhere—on billboards, on the radio, in political campaign ads, and public service announcements. It has become the lingua franca of Nairobi’s youth, who make up 60 percent of the Kenyan population. Politicians, advertisers, and schoolteachers are taking notice.

Each neighborhood speaks its own variety, and the language itself changes almost weekly. “Whatever Sheng you are speaking now, the words you’re saying now, when you go like even for three months and you come back, they’re done,” says Octopizzo. The language is familiar enough that a Sheng dictionary came out recently. But dictionaries for Sheng have a short shelf life because of how rapidly the vocabulary change. “After a year,” he says, “the dictionary is expired.”

Its dynamism is one of the language’s unique features. Mutonya says that new Sheng words or phrases are often introduced by entertainers, DJs, and musicians like Octopizzo, all of whom compete to make their own original contributions. Sometimes such innovation is driven by necessity: Octopizzo invented a word for marijuana, octombeedo, so that it would get past the radio censors. Not surprisingly, words that describe illegal substances or law enforcement change most rapidly.

“It’s like a code,” says Octo, “[even] your parents don’t know what you guys are talking about.”

“It’s very secretive. That’s the best thing about it,” says Joseph, a 31-year old card dealer in a Nairobi casino. He spends long afternoons sitting at a coffee stall in the middle of a parking lot filled with large piles of gray sand and construction materials, chewing qat with his friends and chatting in Sheng. Though qat is legal in Kenya, the older generation often don’t approve, and he lists four different Sheng words for it as we talk: ketepa, jamba, veve, gomba.

Sheng allows young people to get around other cultural taboos. In 2005, a government anti-HIV AIDS campaign used Sheng to reach young people; advertisements in Sheng discussing sex  appeared on billboards and radio. It was a way of not only speaking to youth, but also of avoiding the ire of older Kenyans who might have disapproved of such an overtly sexual public service announcement.

Sheng even has its own flagship radio station of sorts, Ghetto Radio, which has taken Nairobi by storm. Founded in early 2008, Ghetto Radio calls itself “the official Sheng station” and “the voice of the youth.” Joseph Lotukoi, 28, a producer for the station, who grew up in a Nairobi slum, says it’s not just the words they use, but also what they talk about—crime, joblessness, child labor, early marriage, and other issues that affect the young and the poor. “We empower [the youth] and also entertain them,” says Lotukoi.

The entrance to the Ghetto Radio studios in Nairobi, Kenya.
The entrance to the Ghetto Radio studios in Nairobi, Kenya.

Courtesy Laura Dean

Ghetto Radio is the only station that broadcasts the news in Sheng. By broadcasting it across the entire city, the station simultaneously makes Sheng a bit more standardized, while trying to actively find new words. There is even a segment called “update your slang” on the morning show that brings in and explains new Sheng words from around the city.

Languages similar to Sheng’s urban slang are popping up in other African cities where, historically, people have spoken a variety of languages. “We have the Sheng-like forms in the major cities,” says Muntonya. “In Soweto … we have [a variety] in Yaoundé, [in] Cameroon, we have [a variety in] Lusaka.”

The Ghetto Radio van in Nairobi, Kenya.
The Ghetto Radio van in Nairobi, Kenya.

Courtesy Laura Dean

Not everyone welcomes the spread of this organic language from Nairobi’s streets. Eunice Mlati, the head mistress of the state-run Moi Avenue Primary School, sees the language as just another obstacle to teaching the next generation of Kenyans. “Sheng actually interferes with performance of students in languages, both English and Swahili,” says Mlati. Sheng comes in, and test scores go down, she says.

Mlati has zero tolerance for it. “Teachers should stress that children shouldn’t be speaking Sheng, especially in school and even at home,” she says. “If they speak English, let them speak English, if Swahili, then Swahili.” At the heart of her complaint—besides the fact that it serves as a secret language for students that many educators don’t understand—is the fact that she believes that only languages that can be tested should be taught in school. Sheng, because it changes so rapidly, would be very difficult to test.

And yet, despite the best efforts of people like Mlati, there are children growing up all over Nairobi who speak Sheng as their first language. And that, says Mutonya, can be a good thing. Given all of Kenya’s bitter ethnic and class lines, Sheng has a “detribalizing” effect, he says. Those who are united by the language “are not Kikuyus, they’re not Luos … they are Nairobians, young Nairobians speaking Sheng.”

Source: http://www.slate.com/articles/news_and_politics/roads/2013/11/sheng_is_becoming_a_kenyan_language_how_the_urban_slang_of_nairobi_slums.html
Category: made in america   Asap Rocky   Call Of Duty Ghosts  

Court reinstates most of Texas’ new abortion rules

FILE – In this July 15, 2013 file photo, two signs that read “Who Lobbied For This?” and “We Need Healthcare Options, Not Obstacles” are held by attendees of a rally in front of Dallas city hall where a group of nearly 200 gathered to protest the approval of sweeping new restrictions on abortion in Texas. A U.S. appeals court on Thursday, Oct. 31, 2013, issued a ruling reinstating most of Texas’ tough new abortion restrictions, which means as many as 12 clinics will not be able to perform the procedure starting as soon as Friday. (AP Photo/Tony Gutierrez, File)

FILE – In this July 15, 2013 file photo, two signs that read “Who Lobbied For This?” and “We Need Healthcare Options, Not Obstacles” are held by attendees of a rally in front of Dallas city hall where a group of nearly 200 gathered to protest the approval of sweeping new restrictions on abortion in Texas. A U.S. appeals court on Thursday, Oct. 31, 2013, issued a ruling reinstating most of Texas’ tough new abortion restrictions, which means as many as 12 clinics will not be able to perform the procedure starting as soon as Friday. (AP Photo/Tony Gutierrez, File)

File – In this Oct. 29, 2013 file photo, Dottie and Tom Knodell, opponents of abortion, hold signs outside a Planned Parenthood Clinic, in San Antonio. A U.S. appeals court on Thursday, Oct. 31, 2013, issued a ruling reinstating most of Texas’ tough new abortion restrictions, which means as many as 12 clinics will not be able to perform the procedure starting as soon as Friday. (AP Photo/Eric Gay, File)

AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — A federal appeals court on Thursday ruled that most of Texas’ tough new abortion restrictions can take effect immediately — a decision that means a third of the state’s clinics that perform the procedure won’t be able to do so starting as soon as Friday.

A panel of judges at the 5th Circuit Court of Appeals in New Orleans said the law requiring doctors to have admitting privileges at a nearby hospital can take effect while a lawsuit challenging the restrictions moves forward. The panel issued the ruling three days after District Judge Lee Yeakel said the provision serves no medical purpose.

In its 20-page ruling, the appeals court panel acknowledged that the provision “may increase the cost of accessing an abortion provider and decrease the number of physicians available to perform abortions.” However, the panel said that the U.S. Supreme Court has held that having “the incidental effect of making it more difficult or more expensive to procure an abortion cannot be enough to invalidate” a law that serves a valid purpose, “one not designed to strike at the right itself.”

The panel left in place a portion of Yeakel’s order that prevents the state from enforcing the U.S. Food and Drug Administration protocol for abortion-inducing drugs in cases where the woman is between 50 and 63 days into her pregnancy. Doctors testifying before the court had said such women would be harmed if the protocol were enforced.

After Yeakel halted the restrictions, Texas Attorney General Greg Abbott had made an emergency appeal to the conservative 5th Circuit, arguing that the law requiring doctors to have admitting privileges is a constitutional use of the Legislature’s authority.

“This unanimous decision is a vindication of the careful deliberation by the Texas Legislature to craft a law to protect the health and safety of Texas women,” Abbott, a Republican who is running for governor, said in a written statement.

Lawyers for Planned Parenthood and other abortion providers had argued that the regulations do not protect women and would shut down a third of the 32 abortion clinics in Texas.

Twelve of Texas’ abortion clinics won’t be able to perform the procedure starting as soon as Friday.

In a statement Thursday, Planned Parenthood said the appeals court decision means “abortion will no longer be available in vast stretches of Texas.”

“This fight is far from over,” Planned Parenthood President Cecile Richards said in the statement. “This restriction clearly violates Texas women’s constitutional rights by drastically reducing access to safe and legal abortion statewide.”

The court’s order is temporary until it can hold a complete hearing, likely in January.

The restrictions are among the toughest in the nation and gained notoriety when Democratic state Sen. Wendy Davis launched a nearly 13-hour filibuster against them in June. Davis has since launched her own gubernatorial campaign and could face Abbott in the November 2014 election. Republican Gov. Rick Perry has said he will not seek another term.

The law that the Legislature passed this summer also bans abortions at 20 weeks of pregnancy and beginning in October 2014 requires doctors to perform all abortions in surgical facilities.

Officials for one chain of abortion clinics testified in the trial that Yeakel oversaw that they’ve tried to obtain admitting privileges for their doctors at 32 hospitals, but so far only 15 accepted applications and none have announced a decision. Many hospitals with religious affiliations will not allow abortion doctors to work there, while others fear protests if they provide privileges. Many have requirements that doctors live within a certain radius of the facility, or perform a minimum number of surgeries a year that must be performed in a hospital.

Associated PressSource: http://hosted2.ap.org/APDEFAULT/3d281c11a96b4ad082fe88aa0db04305/Article_2013-10-31-Texas%20Abortion%20Restrictions-Lawsuit/id-42429cd6e70b44118d149c43825ee240
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